Into the woods piano vocal score pdf

Can You Find the Hidden Objects in These 5 Images? How good are you at finding hidden objects in a sea of visual clutter? Lenstore, a UK company that sells contact lenses and sunglasses, created a set of visual puzzles to test out your optic detective skills as you find the caterpillar nestled amongst the sushi, the into the woods piano vocal score pdf hiding in the crowd of ostriches, and more. You only have 45 seconds to locate each hidden object until the game moves on to a new puzzle.

Afterward, if you fill out a few questions about demographics, like your age and gender, you can compare your data to average scores from the company’s preliminary tests with 2000 Irish and British citizens. Overall, the company found that women were faster and took fewer attempts to spot hidden objects than men. They also found that younger people were better at finding the objects than older people. But don’t feel bad if you didn’t get all five. The average score was just 2. There’s a Ghost Hiding in This Illustration—Can You Find It?

Gergely Dudás is at it again. If you’ve scanned the landscape again and again and can’t find Sheet to save your life, go ahead and click here to see where he’s hiding. The Titanic never completed its voyage across the Atlantic, but a LEGO replica of the infamous ocean liner has officially landed in the U. As CNN reports, the model, which was constructed by a 10-year-old boy from Reykjavik, Iceland, holds the record for the largest LEGO replica of the ship ever assembled.

LEGO fans can spot the ambitious creation at the Titanic Museum Attraction in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee starting Monday, April 16. Consisting of 56,000 bricks, the structure is 5 feet tall and 26 feet long. It took Brynjar Karl Bigisson, who’s now 15, a total of 700 hours to build it over the course of 11 months. Ships and LEGO bricks are two of Brynjar Karl’s greatest interests. When he was 10 he set out to construct a LEGO Titanic that would be proportional to his minifigures. His engineer grandfather helped him convert the original Titanic blueprints to LEGO-size and calculate how many bricks the model would require.

Brynjar Karl is also an outspoken supporter of kids on the autism spectrum like himself. He has given talks about living with the disorder and has even written a book on the subject. The LEGO Titanic project has taken me on a new exciting journey,” he says on his website. After showcasing his replica Titanic in Iceland, Sweden, Norway, and Germany, Brynjar Karl is bringing his model to America for the first time.

The LEGO Titanic will be displayed at the Titanic Museum Attraction through December 2019. Next time you complain about your boring desk job, think back to Victorian times—an era before the concept of occupational health and safety rules—and count yourself lucky. Back then, people were forced to think of some imaginative ways to earn a living, from seeking out treasure in the sewers to literally selling excrement. Leeches were once a useful commodity, with both doctors and quacks using the blood-sucking creatures to treat a number of ailments, ranging from headaches to “hysteria. But pity the poor leech collector who had to use themselves as a human trap. The job usually fell to poor country women, who would wade into dirty ponds in the hope of attracting a host of leeches. PURE FINDER Despite the clean-sounding name, this job actually involved collecting dog feces from the streets of London to sell to tanners, who used it in the leather-making process.

Dog poop was known as “pure” because it was used to purify the leather and make it more flexible . Leather was in great demand in Victorian times, as it was used not only as tack for horses but for shoes, boots, bags, and in bookbinding. An 1851 illustration of a sewer-hunter or “tosher. Victorian London had a huge network of over-worked sewers under the city, washing away the effluence of the crowded metropolis. Toshers made their living down in the dark sewers, sifting through raw sewage to find any valuables that had fallen down the drain. MATCHSTICK MAKERS Matchsticks are made by cutting wood into thin sticks and then dipping the ends into white phosphorus—a highly toxic chemical.

In the Victorian era, this work was mainly performed by teenage girls who worked in terrible conditions, often for between 12 and 16 hours a day with few breaks. MUDLARK Like the toshers, these workers made their meagre money from dredging through the gloop looking for items of value to sell, although in this case they were plying their messy trade on the shores of the Thames instead of mostly in the sewers. Tiny children as young as four years old were employed as chimney sweeps, their small stature making them the perfect size to scale up the brick chimneys. All the climbing in the claustrophobic space of a chimney meant many sweeps’ elbows and knees were scraped raw, until repeated climbing covered them with calluses. FUNERAL MUTE Anyone familiar with Charles Dickens’s Oliver Twist will remember that one of the orphan’s hated early jobs was as a mute for undertaker Mr.

Rat catchers usually employed a small dog or ferret to search out the rats that infested the streets and houses of Victorian Britain. Catching rats was a dangerous business—not only did the vermin harbor disease, but their bites could cause terrible infections. These children would claim an area of the street as their patch, and when a rich man or woman wished to exit their carriage and walk across the filth-strewn street, the sweeper would walk before them clearing the detritus from their path, ensuring their patron’s clothes and shoes stayed clean. In the early 19th century the only cadavers available to medical schools and anatomists were those of criminals who had been sentenced to death, leading to a severe shortage of bodies to dissect.